“You don’t touch culture:” FIVA President Patrick Rollet on defining and protecting historic cars.

Interview of Patrick Rollet by Hemmings Daily

Our recent articles on the Charter of Turin Handbook and on what categories of vehicle the Federation Internationale des Vehicules Anciens considers historic prompted a good deal of discussion, not just in our comments section, but also among FIVA leadership. Should FIVA – which aims to be a globally recognized authority on historic vehicles and an advocate of keeping them on the road – include modified cars in that definition? Should it even be making such distinctions? And how do questions like these influence the organization’s goals and activities across multiple continents with vastly different automotive cultures?

To answer these questions, we spoke with FIVA President Patrick Rollet, a British car enthusiast who lives in Paris and who has helmed the organization since 2013. The resulting interview below has been lightly edited for clarity and length.

Hemmings Daily: Can you quickly tell us the history and mission of FIVA?

Patrick Rollet: We published a book of our history last year to celebrate the 50th anniverary of FIVA – it’s pretty heavy stuff.

It started in ’56 – it was a sort of European old gentleman affair started in a chateau in Switzerland with a few people from Germany, Belgium, Switzerland, and England, of course. We took two pre-federations and merged them to create FIVA.

Our first mission was, as they say in the Netherlands, to keep yesterday’s vehicles on tomorrow’s roads. So we were lobbying, later in Brussels, to make sure with all their clean environment and road safety rules that these cars have exemptions.


Read the full interview here

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